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Associate Professor David Grayden
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Electrical approach triggers new treatments for chronic disease

Known variously as bioelectronics or electroceuticals, emerging therapies that use the electronics or electrical stimulation of the nervous system to treat chronic disease offer exciting potential for improved human health and wellbeing.

Fuel efficiency and emissions focus of motoring research partnership
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Fuel efficiency and emissions focus of motoring research partnership

The need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is driving innovation in the passenger vehicle industry, and the University of Melbourne is at the forefront of research efforts through its longstanding partnership with the Ford Motor Company.

Patients see light as first sign of restored vision from bionic eye prototype
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Patients see light as first sign of restored vision from bionic eye prototype

The brain’s electrical conductivity creates a special place in medicine for electrical engineers. It has allowed them to open new frontiers, using implanted electronic devices to bypass damaged human sense organs and reconnect the brain to information about the external world.

Research students in the Polymer Science Group Laboratory, within the Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
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Polymer implants provide next generation medical treatments

The potential of miniature implants to deliver controlled doses of medicine over many months is expected to revolutionise health care and improve treatment for an increasingly wide range of conditions over the next decade.

Augmented reality brings new life to retail
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Augmented reality brings new life to retail

Augmented reality can bring a whole new experience to the purchase of clothing, but storytelling skills can add a crucial link when using this technology to connect place and culture for customers in retail settings.

Putting a window and lasers in the hull of a ship to improve efficiency
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Putting a window and lasers in the hull of a ship to improve efficiency

Associate Professor Nicholas Hutchins is working with a team of international collaborators to develop anti-fouling strategies for ships.